If you see stuff happening online that wouldn't be ok offline, it might be time to take action.

When the banter turns bad
  • Stop Stop
  • Speak Speak
  • Support Support

Stop Video

Take time out before getting involved, and don’t share or like negative comments.

Try and get an overview of what’s really going on.

It’s easy to misinterpret things so don’t jump straight in. Remember there are often several sides to a story so try and understand where everyone’s coming from.

Check the community guidelines for the site you’re on.

Every social media site platform has a set of rules about what is and isn’t acceptable. These guidelines also have some handy pointers about what to do if you’re not happy about stuff, so it’s worth checking them out.

Speak Video

Ask an adult or friend that you can trust for advice.

Have a word with an adult you trust – it could be a parent or other member of your family, or a teacher or youth worker.

Many people don’t do this because they’re worried about making things worse– but if something’s making you uncomfortable, you need to talk about it.

Use the report button for the social media it’s happening on.

If you’re concerned about online content or behaviour, please report it to the site or platform you’re on.

Most social media platforms will follow up on you once something has been reported and keep you informed of their decisions.

You can find more details of how to report stuff here.

Speak to one of the charities set up to help with situations like this, such as Childline.

Childline can support young people who are experiencing all forms of bullying. If you’re worried about yourself or someone you know, they’re on hand for support and advice, both online or on the phone.

Support Video

Give the person being bullied a supportive message to let them know they’re not alone.

If a friend’s being bullied online, posting or texting them a positive message can make a big difference. It may not solve all their problems, but it’s a good way to show them they’re not alone.

Encourage them to talk to someone they can trust.

People being bullied can withdraw into themselves. It’s really important they open up to someone they trust, especially an adult.

Give them a positive distraction from the situation.

Being bullied can feel overwhelming. Doing things with your friend may help to take their mind off things for a while, and can have a big impact on the way they feel.

If you can, send them some stuff that’s got nothing to do with the bullying situation. And maybe spend a bit of one-to-one time with them offline.

Tap to flip

Our Partners

Our Partners
  • Anti-Bullying Alliance

    Anti-Bullying Alliance

  • Apple

    Apple

  • BBC

    BBC

  • BT

    BT

  • The Diana Award

    The Diana Award

  • EE

    EE

  • Facebook

    Facebook

  • Google

    Google

  • Internet Matters

    Internet Matters

  • NSPCC

    NSPCC

  • O2

    O2

  • Sky

    Sky

  • Snapchat

    Snapchat

  • Supercell

    Supercell

  • TalkTalk

    TalkTalk

  • Twitter

    Twitter

  • Virgin Media

    Virgin Media

  • Vodafone

    Vodafone